KETCHIKAN (KDN) — The Alaska Department of Fish and Game has revised its general sport fishing bag and harvest limits for king salmon in Southeast Alaska, beginning at 12:01 a.m. on Monday.

The department is changing the bag and harvest limits in an effort to keep the region’s sport harvest of king salmon within the target of 37,120 non-hatchery produced fish. The number is derived through a formula established through the U.S.-Canada Pacific Salmon Treaty process.

“Although sport fishing effort in Southeast Alaska is lower than expected, the harvest rate in the sport fishery is double what was anticipated,” states the department’s announcement. “With higher than average harvest rates under the current regional king salmon regulations, the sport fishery is expected to exceed its king salmon allocation by 3,460 to 12,650 fish. By enacting the new king salmon regulations ..., the sport fishery is expected to stay within its allocation.”

The announcement emphasized that the current sport regulations established for king salmon in the non-retention areas and designated hatchery sport harvest areas in Ketchikan, Wrangell, Petersburg and other areas of Southeast Alaska will remain in effect and unchanged by the newly announced regulations.

For Alaska residents, the new regulations set the regional bag and possession limit at two king salmon of 28 inches or greater in length, according to the department announcement. That’s down from the current regional bag limit of three king salmon for residents.

 From Oct. 1 through March 31, 2022, sport anglers may use two rods when fishing for king salmon — but a person using two rods under this regulation may only retain salmon.

The nonresident bag and possession limit will be one king salmon of 28 inches or greater in length.

Also, from Jan. 1 through June 30, a nonresident's total harvest limit is three king salmon of 28 inches or greater in length, according to the Fish and Game announcement. That’s down from the previous annual limit of four king salmon.

And, nonresidents’ allowable annual limit will ratchet downward as the year goes on.

 From July 1 through July 7, a nonresident's total harvest limit is two king salmon, 28 inches or greater in length —  and any king salmon harvested by the nonresident from Jan. 1 through June 30 will apply toward the two-fish total harvest limit.

Then, from July 8 through Dec. 31, a nonresident's total harvest limit is one king salmon of 28 inches or greater in length, and any king salmon harvested by the nonresident from Jan. 1 through July 7 will apply toward the one fish total harvest limit, according to Fish and Game. A nonresident sport angler must enter the species, date, and location on their sport fishing license or on a nontransferable harvest record immediately after landing and retaining a king salmon.

The announcement published Thursday stated that the department will be monitoring the sport fishery for king salmon, and that additional management action will be taken if needed to keep the sport fishery within the sport allocation.”

The new regulations are scheduled to remain in effect through March 31. For further information, contact Fish and Game.