The interior of the U.S. Forest Service's recreation cabin at Deer Mountain

The interior of the U.S. Forest Service's recreation cabin at Deer Mountain, including a new propone-fueled heater, is shown in this Oct. 11 image. Photo courtesy of Ken Arriola

Ketchikan’s Deer Mountain cabin recently has had an upgrade to its heating stove, which was installed by U.S. Forest Service personnel.

In an email sent to the Daily News this week from USFS Media Relations Specialist Erica Keene, she explained the process of the upgrade.

“The Deer Mountain oil stove was not functional and Forest Service staff wanted to find a solution that would work well for cabin users,” she wrote. “The Ketchikan Misty Fjords Ranger District recreation team brain-stormed solutions that would be easier for users and still work well for the site.”

The agreed-upon solution was the installation of a small, portable propane heater that would heat the space efficiently. A bonus to the change in fuel source was that users now can utilize the small one-pound propane canisters which are easy to find at local stores.

Keene added that the heater is secured to the floor and has a built-in emergency shutoff. Crews also installed a carbon monoxide detector in the cabin for safety.

Keene also included a quote from Ketchikan Misty Fjords Ranger District recreation staff officer Denise Wolvin, who said, “We really want to hear feedback on this new solution. User testimony can be a big help as we work to improve people’s opportunities and experiences on the Tongass National Forest.”

People who would like to provide feedback can email Wolvin at denise.wolvin@usda.gov.

According to information at the USFS website www.fs.usda.gov, the cabin is described as a 16-foot-square A-frame shelter that was reconstructed in 2008 and 2009. It features two double bunks, a table, benches and a cooking counter, in addition to the new propane heating stove.

The cabin is offered with zero fees on a first-come, first-served basis, with no reservations available. It is located at an elevation of 2,900 feet, 2.5 miles from the Deer Mountain National Recreation trailhead located at Ketchikan Lakes Road.