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The October municipal election isn’t all about candidates.

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We — Americans — appreciate our Constitution.

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Christopher M. “Kit“ Keyes, 68, died Sept. 7, 2019, in Nashville, Tennessee.
Rebecca Hannah Halpin, 68, died on Sept. 1, 2019, at her home in Ketchikan. She was born on Aug. 3, 1953, in Crawfordsville, Indiana.
Eleanor Margaret Wagner, 86, died Sept. 4, 2019, in Anchorage. She was born on Feb. 18, 1936, in Metlakatla. Mrs.
8/23/2019
Forgiven

President Trump, who admires honorably discharged U.S. military veterans of every persuasion, this week rightly signed an executive order forgiving all student loan debt for any veterans who are permanently disabled.

The order also forgives any federal income tax on the loans.

This is hundreds of millions of dollars, but, when taken in the context of their sacrifice, it is a small price to pay out.

The order comes about because of the currently burdensome application process veterans endure if they try to get their education loan debt forgiven.

The law allows it, but only about 20 percent of the 50,000 who are eligible have applied or stuck with the process. They must be 100% disabled.

Trump also has hired a student loan ombudsman for student loan borrowers experiencing challenges with the student loan industry.

This will benefit all students who apply for and/or receive student loans.

The appointment is timely because of the public attention on the high cost of college education, a topic that has been featured in Democratic presidential primary debates.

Trump is in tune with the student loan issue. He is a stalwart supporter of the nation’s veterans. As a whole, the nation is, too, and Americans should be repaying veterans for their sacrifices.

College loan forgiveness is one way to accomplish it.