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Gov. Michael J.

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Whether it was the shock of Gov. Michael J.

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Mary J. Mossburg, 80, died Feb. 9, 2019, in Bellingham, Washington. Mrs.
Robert Marcus Holt IV, 2, died Jan. 2, 2019, in Metlakatla. He was born Nov. 11, 2016, in Ketchikan, and attended Early Head Start.
Marylyn Burens Conley, 73, died Jan. 31, 2019, in Sitka. She was born Marylyn Augusta Burens on May 5, 1945, in Evanston, Illinois.
2/11/2019
$$$$$$$

Show us the money.

The “Green New Deal” has been revealed by congressional Democrats led by newly minted Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Included in this deal is replacing or upgrading every building in the United States.

To which we ask:  “Where’s the money?” Or “Who’s going to pay for it?”

Us? Our neighbor? That would be nice, but even nice neighbors have their limits.

The city? The state? The federal government?

The rebuilding/upgrading idea is in order to increase energy efficiency.

A worthy goal, among a list of similarly unrealistic solutions to predicaments.

Two other items of special interest in the deal: Making air travel obsolete, and economic security for all who are unable or unwilling to work.

The former would be helpful to the Alaska Marine Highway System if ship emissions passed the green deal test. AMHS would be the only way to travel. But, as for Alaska Airlines, Ketchikan’s small aircraft operations and medivac flights, not so much. Alaskans would get nowhere fast. Travel would slow down, as would life’s pace. More on life’s pace another time.

The latter idea essentially expands Social Security to all ages. Twenty-somethings wouldn’t need college and could live free forever. As of this writing at the end of a long day, we think that one could gain traction. But, again, the question becomes: Who’s going to pay for it? Jeff Bezos? Bill Gates? Warren Buffet? Santa Claus? If people aren’t working, it won’t be income taxes.

These ideas are outlandish to say the least. But Cortez and her colleagues shouldn’t quit thinking. They might come up with a realistic and applaudable idea yet.

And a way to pay for it.