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We're kind of fond of this Earth; it's home. We're not alone.

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It can be better to let the other guy go first. After seeing how it goes for him, we might not want to go at all.

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Bruce Oliver Brink, 79, died April 18, 2014, at Life Care Center in Mt. Vernon, Wash.
Florence Elizabeth Prose, 90, died on April 14, 2014, in Ketchikan.
Charles Jasper Solomon, 94, died April 10, 2014, in Ketchikan.
Janette Edna Powers, 85, died April 15, 2014 at St. Josephs Hospital, Bellingham, Wash., after a short illness.
Mark Edward Cooley, 55, died April 9, 2014, with his family by his side at their home in Des Moines, Wash. He was born in Portland, Ore., on April 10, 1958. He grew up in Butteville, Ore., on the Willamette River, and graduated from North Marion High School.
Esther Rita Brown, 53, died on April 10, 2014, at her home in Ketchikan.
4/30/2013
A place for dogs

It would be a dog owner's dream come true for Ketchikan to have a dog park.

The dog could go at its pace; the owner at what often is a completely different one.

Then, after they're done frolicking through the park, they meet up — walk completed!

Ahhh, that would be the life.

Instead of just dreaming, a group of owners is checking into the idea of a dog park. For those who don't know, it is a fenced-in and gated place where dogs would be allowed to exercise and do their business off leash.

It likely would reduce the use of athletic fields and other inappropriate places for dog exercise. Dogs would get the chance to run off their energy. It might lead to dogs as better housemates and neighbors.

It would be a safe place for dogs, and improve the possibilities of dog ownership. If owners or prospective owners have a place to take their dogs, then they are more likely to have dogs, perhaps even rescue dogs from uncertain or grave futures.

Of course, the park wouldn't be operated without rules. Dogs who frequent the park would need to be licensed and current on their vaccinations, but a park might encourage more owners to comply with those laws.

A park would provide a place for owners to meet, where seasoned owners might share problems and possible solutions regarding dog behavior. Plus, it's simply a place to socialize.

For those interested in a Ketchikan dog park, the group is meeting at 5:30 tonight at the public library.

Dog owners or would-be dog owners might want to attend.