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People line up for free. Even people who have no business receiving a handout.

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This is no time to mince words. Republican Gov. Sean Parnell will be in town today to take on challenger Bill Walker, an independent candidate, and Libertarian Carolyn Clift in Ketchikan's 2014 Alaska gubernatorial debate.

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Anne (Davidson) Caskey, 73, died Sept. 27, 2014, in Ketchikan.
Don L. Scruggs, 86, died July 15, 2014, in Sun City, Arizona.
Christine Marie Edenso, 70, died Sept. 22, 2014, in Ketchikan.
Karl Emory Steward, 86, died Aug. 11, 2014, in Bullhead City, Arizona.
12/11/2012
Let’s help

We are all in a hurry sometimes. Those times seem to coincide with lines forming, and having to wait, and needing to be two places at once.

If it’s no fun to stand in line, it’s no fun to be the worker at the head of the line trying to help folks as well as they can be helped.

For those of us on the getting-served end of the line, let’s treat the servers — be it at a restaurant, a retail establishment, a financial institution or a service agency — the same way we’d want to see our own parents, grandparents or children treated. Those who are experienced on the serving end of the equation understand that they can help one person at a time, and they need to do their best with each individual as the case arises. Others are new to such work and learn as they go. Crabby customers don’t help an already flustered newbie learn the ropes of good customer service.

Just as in child rearing, when a “no” is so much more memorable than a “yes” or a “good job,” so it is with customer service. Most people are nice — but a single nasty person can replace a day’s worth of great ones.

It sounds cheesy but it’s true: Be nice. Help someone else have a good day. Leave a bigger tip for the harried waitress if you can afford it. Thank the teller for taking enough time with you. Let the sales person know you appreciate it that she went to the back to check on availability of a product you wanted. When you call a business, hold patiently; the customer who has driven into town rightly takes precedence over the person who calls in (even though calling in might save you a trip).

Let’s all put ourselves in the other person’s place, and help each other along through the holiday season.

Be nice!