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Reduce. Reuse. Reap a little cash on the side? One of the unpleasant indignities of living on an island in Southeast Alaska is that we are forced — in a very tangible way — to confront how much waste we create. That confrontation comes in the form of a bill. With space at premium, we pay to bale, ship and dispose of much of our trash inside Washington state.

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Alaska is proud of its parks, especially the Gates of the Arctic, thank you very much.

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Ronald Shaw, 82, died Feb. 27, 2015 in Anchorage.
Robert Eugene Chapman, 60, died Feb. 14, 2015, in Ketchikan.
Frances “Pat” Bailey Koons, 82, died Feb. 22, 2015, in Ketchikan.
8/21/2014
It’s in the books
With another chapter in Ketchikan's election story written, it's appropriate to thank the candidates for placing their names on the ballot.

Not everyone can win, but everyone can participate. It is the participation that makes Alaska preferable to other places in the world where a vote doesn't count.

Becoming a candidate is no small matter. It takes a commitment not only by the candidate, but the candidate's family and friends. It involves effort, time and money, and all in great quantities.

It is the same for those who take on the campaign for a ballot measure, such as the oil-production tax referendum that appeared on Tuesday's ballot. Both sides of the debate put their hard-earned capital on the line and invested hours into convincing voters that they had the answer to the question of how the oil industry should pay for the Alaska oil it extracts.

Often those who work on a ballot measure also are committed to supporting one candidate or another.

To all of those who participated in the election by seeking office and volunteering to help a campaign, the efforts are much appreciated.

There's a sense of gratefulness to the voters who listened to the campaigns and took the time the vote.

And, finally, and equally appreciated, are the election-day workers, the people who man the polls and protect the integrity of the election-day process.

With everyone playing a part, the primary election is in history books, and it's on to the local and general elections.