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No one likes to raise taxes. The Ketchikan Gateway Borough and its Assembly are no different.

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It's a move in the right direction. The first Anchorage office building the state Legislature wanted to buy for itself had a price tag of about $34 million.

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Linda Susan Van Horn, 66, died April 27, 2016, peacefully at PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center after a year-long battle with cancer.
9/6/2013
Best wishes

The Jewish New Year is being celebrated this week in Ketchikan.

The two-day event began at sundown Wednesday and will end at nightfall today. It is one of the Jewish community's most holy days. Called Rosh Hashanah, it signifies the creation of the world as described in the Bible's Old Testament.

Rosh Hashanah is the first of the High Holy Days, followed 10 days later with Yom Kippur, the day of atonement.

As with the traditional American new year, Rosh Hashanah signifies a time for a fresh start, a time to repent for past ill deeds and begin again or resolve to improve one's behavior moving forward.

But unlike the American new year, it isn't one of rowdy parties and football games. It's a time for prayer, religious services and festive fare — apples and honey, raisin challah, honey cake and pomegranate, all of which symbolize a wish for a sweet new year.

That's how the Jewish people would have it: a sweet new year.

For them, and all of the rest of us, beginning anew at the end of this week with goodness and sweetness, well, it's not to be argued with. It's what most people, regardless of religious affiliation, seek.

We wish our Jewish friends a pleasant Rosh Hashanah.