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Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska, made an interesting point about the U.S. Forest Service on Tuesday during a congressional hearing on federal timber policy.

Ketchikan can't say it doesn't have choices in Tuesday's election.

Ruth Fontaine Pechay, 90, died Oct. 1, 2015, in Ketchikan.
Roberta Alice Starrish, 73, died Sept. 26, 2015, in Metlakatla.
Cecelia “Ceil” Lewis, 72, died of cancer on Sept. 22, 2015, at her home in Sun City, Arizona.
To do on first

A good ending to a story played out recently when smoke was smelled at a South Tongass house, where residents — warned by their smoke alarms — escaped the home. A toy close to a heating source was singed but, because of the early warning, no fire ensued and no one was hurt.

We are, none of us, in control of our destiny overall — accidents happen; we might be in the wrong place at the wrong time; or someone with ill intent succeeds in wreaking havoc. But we can do seemingly little things that avert some bad things from turning horribly wrong. One such doable thing is to regularly check and replace batteries in our smoke alarms.

Replacing batteries is not something that automatically comes to mind and thus is often overlooked. That’s why fire prevention specialists suggest attaching the practice to a regular day twice a year: When we change our clocks for standard and daylight time, go ahead and replace those batteries.

Besides regular replacement, the batteries should be checked in the interim. How about on the first of every month, or the first Monday? Mark it on the calendar, and do it.

That will go a long way toward good endings like that recent story. That’s what we all want.