Home | Ketchikan | Alaska | Sports | Waterfront | Business | Education | Religion | Scene
Classifieds | Place a class ad | PDF Edition | Calendar | Discussions | Moderated Chat | Home Delivery| How to cancel


Labor Day is about work ethics. Or it should be. In the current economy not all Americans can claim a paid job, but most Americans still do something. It's often work, and a choice is made in regard to whether to work well.

Read more...
It's an early morning again for more than a couple thousand Ketchikan residents.

Read more...
Araceli Fernandez Seludo, 87, died Aug. 26, 2014, in Cavite, Philippines.
7/16/2013
We’re silver

It’s official: Alaska has joined the majority of states in this country to adopt the Silver Alert program.

House Bill 59, signed recently by Gov. Sean Parnell, creates rapid response and notification plans for responders to activate when a vulnerable adult is missing. It would apply to adults with disabilities, including dementias, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and developmental disabilities.

Rep. Max Gruenburg, who introduced HB59, likened it to the Amber Alert program for missing children, and said it can save lives by getting efforts coordinated to find the missing person. The Senate-side sponsor, Johnny Ellis, said the only concern he’d ever heard about the bill was “Why the heck haven’t we done this already?”

Good question.

Now, Alaska is the 39th state to adopt such a program. Here, the program will be designed by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, with help from the Department of Military and Veterans’ Affairs, “to best incorporate the voluntary cooperation of media outlets in notifying the public of missing vulnerable adults,” according to the governor’s office.

We welcome the Silver Alert designation, and look forward to details on how it will play out in Southeast Alaska. Stay tuned.