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The U.S. Coast Guard has a long history in Ketchikan, stretching back more than a century to the days of the U.S. Lighthouse Service in the region.

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After two weeks of political party conventions, it's clear both Democrats and Republicans care deeply about kids.

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Lorraine Emily Durkin, 81, died July 11, 2016, in Seattle.
Leandro A. Guthrie Sr., 80, died peacefully at his Metlakatla home on July 22, 2016.
Lloyd Kevin Jackson, 49, died July 19, 2016, in Ketchikan.
3/8/2014
Daylight saving time

It will be a short weekend — by an hour.

Daylight saving time will begin at 2 a.m. Sunday, which means Alaska and most other states will set their clocks ahead.

The states aren't required to observe daylight saving time. Some don't, among them Hawaii.

The time change occurring Sunday is commonly referred to as "springing forward," while the change in six months is "falling back." It is welcomed by some and frustrates others, especially those losing an hour of sleep in the spring; although, they make up for it in the fall.

The frustrations often lead state legislatures to consider bills eliminating the time changes. According to a National Geographic article, the bills being presented in Tennessee and Kentucky — neighboring states — would create a ridiculous situation.

If legislation passes, it's possible that cities in Tennessee and Kentucky that are separated by only 5 or 10 miles could have two-hour time differences.

Ben Franklin is credited with being the person to come up with the idea of daylight saving time. He thought it wise to make the most of daylight hours. But Germany was the first to implement it. During World War I, it reduced the necessity of artificial lighting and saved on coal for the war effort, according to the Geographic article. The United States adopted daylight saving time during World War II for the same reason.

But ever since, the states have been free to decide whether to change their clocks in the spring and the fall.

Most of us tend to dislike the loss of an hour in the spring and like the addition of an hour in the fall. But, whatever the clock says, there's still only 24 hours in a day.

Except for Sunday, which will have 23.

Happy springing!