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Creating a healthy and safe environment inside the Alaska National Guard is an endeavor that should be free from political games.

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Letty Eileen Cole, 93, died on Oct. 15, 2014, in Ketchikan.
Susan Marie Mallott Patrick, 58, died Oct. 11, 2014, in Ketchikan.
10/29/2013
We’re thrilling?

Flying in and out of Ketchikan is a piece of cake compared to other communities in Alaska.

Ketchikan made the list of airfarewatchdog.com as one of the most thrilling airports.

For Alaskans who've flown into other cities around the state, that came as a surprise. But, even for Alaskans who've chosen to fly instead of boat, drive or take a train outside of Alaska, Ketchikan's appearance on the list is surprising.

The column cited Ketchikan International Airport for its short runway (you only need enough to land and take off), its proximity to mountains (not nearly as close or snug as in other Alaska communities), the nearby ocean (jets fly over oceans all of the time) and bad weather.

The weather can be bad, but nothing out of the ordinary. Ketchikan regulary gets less snow that most places in the United States that get cold, winter weather. Its winds can be high; yet, again, not as high as where hurricanes and tornadoes show up. It rains a lot, but it rains a lot in Seattle and that airport deals with more jets in an hour than Ketchikan has coming in or going out in a day. Fog has been on the horizon of late, but fog interferes with flights in Seattle, too.

Additionally, Ketchikan doesn't have multiple jets flying over its skies simultaneously while jockeying to land, nor a lineup of aircraft on the ground waiting a turn — it's less crowded here and safer on that count.

Flying in and out of Ketchikan can get bumpy. Flying in and out of most places can be bumpy — even in sunny climates where heat rising from the ground causes uneven air.

So we conclude, to call Ketchikan's airport "thrilling" — this being the week of Halloween — that the author saw a ghost at the Ketchikan airport.