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The 2016 Race to Alaska came to a close at 6:45 p.m. Friday when Heather Drugge and Dan Campbell, the two-person crew of the last boat still officially on the 750-mile route from Port Townsend, Washington, to Ketchikan, called it quits in Prince Rupert, British Columbia.

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Ketchikan isn't Tijuana. And it doesn't want to be. Tourists come to Ketchikan to see and experience the community. Here, businesses allow potential customers to find us through word of mouth, advertising and being intrigued by signage and window displays. We don't hawk or bark — or we shouldn't.

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Lloyd Kevin Jackson, 49, died July 19, 2016, in Ketchikan.
Thomas Frank Guthrie Jr., 89, of Metlakatla died on July 20, 2016 in Ketchikan.
1/28/2014
Sweet talk

With all of the negative commentary or trash talking between sports competitors, it's refreshing to hear appreciative words.

Those came from the South Anchorage boys basketball coach over the weekend.

He and his team had a crazy Friday, trying to get to Ketchikan to play two varsity games. Arriving at the Anchorage airport at 6:30 a.m., they flew on schedule until they reached Sitka and Ketchikan fog. The fog forced their Alaska Airlines jet to circle in Sitka, then circle in Ketchikan, and return to Sitka before overheading Ketchikan for Seattle.

Meanwhile, the team spent a couple of hours on the jet in Sitka, just waiting.

They had expected to have lunch in Ketchikan. By the time they arrived in Seattle, Coach Rob Galosich had a hungry team without its baggage.

They had already scheduled and rescheduled their next-day flights into Ketchikan, hoping to get here in time for Saturday's evening game. Friday's had been canceled.

The weather-related difficulties caused havoc for not only the Anchorage team, but for Kayhi's basketball players, their fans, all of those who work to put on the games, and, of course, the airlines.

But Galosich, in the midst of all this, thought of Ketchikan and its team. He wanted to fit in two varsity boys games for the fans; not just one.

He praised the fans, and he didn't want to disappoint. He patiently jumped through the hoops to arrive in Ketchikan and then put on two shows to an appreciative crowd.

There's a winner for you.